vũng tàu sailing – 3

here’s always something new to learn about sailing, and this weekend, we practice the MOB (man over board) situation. Supposed a crew member accidentally falls out of the boat, and we need to come back and rescue him / her under sail as soon as possible. Everyone takes turn taking the skipper role and rehearsing the MOB procedures.

But actually, most fun comes with the smallest type of boat, the Optimist. I had a very good time learning some of my crash courses with it, a tiny, but responsive boat, which gives you the right feeling about how to handle a boat in different wind and water situations. Do it the hard way is the motto I firmly believe to be ultimately true and beneficial! 🙂

rowing machine – 2

ave some times this week to continue working on my rowing machine. First is the basket used to contain weights (just some bricks instead of those iron weight plates). It runs on 4 small plastic wheels lying on 2 wooden rails. A system of line and 3 blocks is used to move the weights basket sliding up and down in an near – vertical manner (75 degrees).

It’s only when I first try running the machine that I’ve found out it is making so much noises, the 8 wheels on wooden rails. I decided to change from the slanted design (4th image) to an upright one (5th image). The weights would run up and down by a system of lines and pulleys, rather than running on rails. Proceed slowly as I have little free time for the moment.

vũng tàu sailing – 2

his weekend, we lower the trimaran’s mast to add a new tang, riveted down near the mast head for the spinnaker (replacing the weak pad – eye that has been blown away by strong wind last week), make some other minor fixes before raising the mast again. We also installed a new spinnaker retrieval line and chute. The work continues pass noon.

Then after a small lunch, we head out to the sea. There’re only some very light winds today, the sea is quite calm, but that’s also a chance to fly and test all sails. The whole thing works perfectly, hoisting and retrieving the spinnaker are quite smooth, together with main sail and jib, enabled the trimaran to carry 6 men out for a pleasureful gentle promenade! 🙂

rowing machine – 1

hy a rowing machine!? First, it is among the best exercising methods which helps building the most groups of muscles. Second, to be used as a complementary way besides kayak paddling, especially when I don’t have time to go to the river, or when I do have, but the tide does not permit a convenient sortie. Below is my on – going building progress.

Most of the rowing machine’s frame is made from cheap MDF, glued, stapled and screwed together, then painted outside with thinned epoxy to strengthen the MDF a bit. Some important parts are made from wood, e.g: rails for the sliding seat… I use 4 small white hard – plastic wheels with ball bearing for durability, and for the sliding motion to be smooth.

vũng tàu sailing – 1

ven greater sailing experiences the last weekend, when we had a chance to sail a slightly larger and heavier trimaran on Vũng Tàu sea. It takes sometimes to rig a new spinnaker, but with just only a mainsail hoisted (the jib is still furled), the boat is already like a restrained horse, ready to show off her real power once the mooring line is released.

With two daggerboards, the trimaran points quite closed to wind, though some few times, it lacks a bit of momentum for a quick, decisive tack, or maybe our handling (of an entry – level sailor) has not been smooth enough. Nevertheless, there were quite a lot of wind and waves that afternoon, and there were plenty of fun riding them obviously! 🙂